Category / KOREAN FOOD

Before I started my Korean Food Project, sundubu jjigae was my favorite thing to order at Korean restaurants. It’s just such a satisfying dish: hot, spicy, filling and healthy. I always thought sundubu jjigae looked complicated to make. Turns out, it’s not difficult at all. My plan is to cook it more often at home and try a wider variety […]

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If you’ve read my recipe for jjin bbang, you know I’m a fiend for sweet red bean paste. So, I had to include patjuk (red bean porridge) in my Korean Food Project. If you want to give your patjuk a more savory taste, you can add salt to it. Since I prefer my patjuk sweet, I add brown […]

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Here’s the funny thing about bukoh guk (dried pollock soup). Though its English name does not sound appetizing, it’s delicious — and it’s delicious even when it comes out of a box. You see, there is a very popular dried/instant soup version of bukoh guk. You can find it many places in Korea; not just grocery […]

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As I’ve already explained, there are several ways to make spicy chicken in Korean cuisine. Earlier in my Korean Food Project, I cooked dak gui (spicy chicken). This time I’m trying dakdoritang, another type of spicy chicken that’s a stew, complete with potatoes, onions and carrots. As you might guess, dakdoritang is a very hearty meal — perfect as the […]

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Why did it take me so long to try cooking pajeon, which is one of the simplest Korean recipes? In part, I hadn’t realized how easy it would be to prepare pajeon in a gluten free way. (I don’t always eat gluten free but I am trying to prepare all the recipes in my Korean Food Project without gluten.) Pajeon has […]

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Earlier in the summer, I cooked bosot namul (seasoned mushrooms). This week, I’m experimenting with mushrooms again by making an entire mushroom stew. One of my clearest Korean food memories involved a spicy bosot jeongol, followed by a serving of fried rice that was cooked directly in the stewpot to absorb the stew’s flavors. It was […]

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Earlier in the summer, I wrote about my love for dak gui and dak galbi, both of which are spicy chicken dishes. Well, jeyuk bokkeum (spicy stir-fried pork) is basically the pork version of those dishes. So, naturally I’m a fan and if you like those dishes, you’ll like this one, as well. Jeyuk Bokkeum […]

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I think of bibimmyeon as a sibling or cousin to naengmyeon, the dish of chewy noodles and mustard-vinegar-beef broth that I made a few months ago. Naengmyeon incorporates several tastes, including salty and sour, but it is not spicy. Bibimmyeon, on the other hand, is spicy; that’s it’s raison d’être. So when you want spicy noodles, cook bibimmyeon […]

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Koreans enjoy several types of jelly noodles. The most popular types are made of either acorn or mung bean flour. Both acorn and mung bean noodles are relatively bland in taste, but become flavorful after they are mixed with seasonings, sauces and add-ins, such as marinated beef. I like both types of jelly noodles and decided to try cooking the mung […]

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I’ve been on a hobak kick recently. (See last week’s recipe, for hobakjeon and hobak namul.) And that made me feel like making hobakjuk, a delicious, yellow-orange, pumpkin porridge. One confusing thing about hobakjuk is that its chief ingredient is actually a squash: kabocha squash. Kabocha, which comes from Japan, looks like a green pumpkin on the outside and a […]

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